Bill Clinton

A study conducted during the 1996 U.S. presidential election cycle found that Democratic nominee President Bill Clinton’s primary personality patterns are Asserting/self-promoting (subsequently relabeled Ambitious/self-serving) and Outgoing/gregarious. A dimensional reconceptualization of the results to examine convergences among the Millon-based personality profile, Simonton’s dimensions of presidential style, and the five-factor model suggested that Clinton was predominantly charismatic/extraverted.


The Clinton Chronicle: Diary of a Political Psychologist (Aubrey Immelman, 1998-99) — On December 19, 1998 William Jefferson Clinton became only the second U.S. president to be impeached by the House of Representatives. What follows is a chronicle, from my perspective as a political psychologist, on debates and controversies in the unfolding of this national drama. The curtain rises as the president prepares on August 17, 1998 to testify before the grand jury in the Starr investigation. The narrative proceeds to the final act as the Senate acquits the president on February 12, 1999 on articles of impeachment brought by the House. But this nightmarish production has no final curtain, as Washington persists in practicing its poisonous partisan politics of personal destruction and as charges of sexual assault more than two decades ago are leveled against Bill Clinton. … Full report


Research reports

The Political Personalities of 1996 U.S. Presidential Candidates Bill Clinton and Bob Dole (Aubrey Immelman, The Leadership Quarterly, Vol. 9, No. 3, Special Issue: Political Leadership, Fall 1998, pp. 335–366).

A Comparison of the Political Personalities of 1996 U.S. Presidential Candidates Bill Clinton and Bob Dole (Paper presented by Aubrey Immelman at the 19th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Vancouver, BC, June 30–July 3, 1996).


Book review

“High Hopes: The Clinton Presidency and the Politics of Ambition” by Stanley A. Renshon (Aubrey Immelman, Political Psychology, Vol. 18, No. 2, Special Issue: Culture and Cross-Cultural Dimensions of Political Psychology, June 1997, pp. 535–539).


Related opinion column

Personality scrutiny brings fewer presidential surprises” (Aubrey Immelman. St. Cloud Times, March 11, 2000, p. 7B.) — It will be unfortunate if the current investigation of President Clinton’s controversial executive pardons of Marc Rich and others culminates in little more than a partisan game of “gotcha” politics. Even an outcome that results in better checks and balances with respect to the president’s pardon power would be of questionable value. Do we really want to abridge the constitutional powers and prerogatives of the president on the strength of — to quote Senate doyen Robert Byrd — the “malodorous” actions of a president no longer in office? … Full report